Hanoians seek Tet blessings at Temple of Literature

By Giang Huy, Nguyen Dong, Vo Thanh, Dac Thanh   February 13, 2021 | 06:50 pm GMT+7
People flocked to Hanoi's Temple of Literature on the second day of the Year of the Buffalo seeking to be blessed with academic luck.
Due to the Covid-19 resurgence, all visitors must go through body temperature screening and put on hand sanitizer before entering the Temple of Literature in the capital citys Dong Da District.

Due to the recent resurgence of Covid-19, visitors had their body temperature screened and were given hand sanitizers to enter the Temple of Literature at 58 Quoc Tu Giam Street, Dong Da District.
The Temple of Literature, built in 1070, is Vietnam's first university.

Hanoians flock to Temple of Literature to have Tets blessing scripted - 2

Thousands visited the temple to light incense and pray for good luck while some taking university entrance exams at mid-year came to seek blessings.

People line up to get blessings in calligraphy on red or yellow do paper priced at VND100,000 ($4.35) per sheet.

People lined up to be blessed with calligraphy in red or yellow do paper that costs VND100,000 ($4.4) a piece.

Calligraphy works, mostly Chinese letters symbolizing what people wish in their lives, like good health, happiness and wealth, are much sought after during the Tet season.

The calligraphers did not have a minute’s rest as the demand came thick and fast.
Calligraphy works, mostly Chinese letters symbolizing what people wish in their lives, like good health, happiness and wealth, are usually much sought after during Tet.
Because of the ongoing Covid-19 outbreak, tables were set up with a plastic barrier to keep a distance between the calligraphers and customers. There were fewer calligraphers this year due to the pandemic.

Hanoians flock to Temple of Literature to have Tets blessing scripted - 8

Calligraphers not only need to have beautiful handwriting but also deep understanding of the meaning of each written word and the aspirations and personality of the persons seeking them.
When Vietnam adopted the Roman alphabet, some teachers became calligraphers who drew Chinese scripts for people to hang on walls at home for good luck and prosperity. The country started using Quoc Ngu, the Vietnamese writing system based on the Roman alphabet, in schools and in the administration in 1919.

Thanh, a student from Nam Tu Liem District, went to the temple with his father and asked for the word Passing Exams.

Thanh of Nam Tu Liem District poses with a calligraphy work he bought in front of the shrine of Chu Van An, the legendary teacher and a high-ranking mandarin of the Tran Dynasty (1225-1400), at the Temple of Literature.
The student visited the temple with his father and got a work done that says 'Passing Exams.'

 
 
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