Former lecturer sets up museum in central Vietnam

By Duc Hung   February 14, 2021 | 09:47 pm GMT+7
A retired lecturer in Ha Tinh Province has opened a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts, reportedly ranging from prehistoric tools to decades-old motorbikes.
Hoa Cuong Museum, located on a 1,500-square-meter plot in Binh An Commune, Ha Tinh’s Loc Ha District, was built in 2018 and opened in November 2020.   With thousands of artifacts and documents divided into 13 themes, the museum cost its owner tens of billions of VND.

Dr Nguyen Quang Cuong, 64, set up the 1,500-square-meter Hoa Cuong Museum in Binh An Commune, Loc Ha District in November 2020 at a cost of tens of billions of dong (VND10 billion = $435,000). It is divided into 13 sections.

Dr. Nguyen Quang Cuong, 64, is the owner of Hoa Cuong Museum. The idea of building a museum initially came to Cuong, who was a teacher at Binh Dinh-based Quy Nhon University, in the 1970s, after the man had lost some of his valuable certificates. He thought he would keep the best things of the past and create a museum for his family and society.  Over the last decades, I have traveled to many areas to collect and purchased artifacts before taking them to my house or my friends’ houses. Late 2020, when I finished building the museum, I took them here for display, Cuong said.

The idea of building a museum initially came to the former professor (pictured) at Binh Dinh Province’s Quy Nhon University in the 1970s after losing some certificates. He thought he would showcase the best of the past for his family and society.
"Over the last few decades I have traveled to many places to collect or buy artifacts," he said.

In the museum’s yard, Cuong exhibits miniatures of Hoang Sa (Paracel) and Truong Sa (Spratly) Islands with a lot of boats that were made more than a century ago.

In the museum yard, Cuong has miniatures of Vietnam's Hoang Sa (Paracel) and Truong Sa (Spratly) Islands and boats made more than a century ago.

Jars, porcelain and china products, and ancient mortars are displayed in the front yard. According to Cuong, there are more than 100 jars, some of which aged up to 500 years.  The Ha Tinh Museum has confirmed that they were made in the Le (1428 - 1527) and Nguyen (1802 - 1945) Dynasties. Some jars were kept as treasures by local families. Whenever I visited them, they avoided me. I patiently convinced them to sell those jars to me, Cuong recalled.

Jars, porcelain, china, and ancient mortars are also displayed in the yard.
Cuong said there are more than 100 jars, some of them almost 500 years old. The Ha Tinh Museum has certified some as being made during the Le Dynasty (1428 - 1789) era.
"Some jars were kept as treasures by local families. Whenever I visited them, they would avoid me. I patiently convinced them to sell those jars to me," he said.

A collection of 20 old motorbikes and bikes is exhibited on the first floor. The vehicles cost from VND 30 - 100 million each. Documents and photos are also displayed on the first floor.

There are 20 old motorbikes and bikes on the first floor, each costing VND30 - 100 million ($1,300 - 4,350). There are also documents and photos on display on the first floor.

The second floor has more than 300 prehistoric artifacts, according to Cuong, including agricultural and domestic tools.

The second floor has more than 300 prehistoric artifacts, according to Cuong, including agricultural and home tools.

More than 200 agricultural tools are kept by Cuong.  In the photo, he holds a stick that was used to carry feasts and offerings in the past.

There are more than 200 agricultural tools dating back to hundreds of years ago. In the photo, Cuong holds a stick that was used to carry offerings.

Many measuring tools come under the display. In the photo, a balance made of ivory from centuries ago.

Many measuring tools are on display, including this balance made of ivory centuries ago.

Sewing machines made in the U.S., Japan, Australia and Russia.

Old sewing machines made in the U.S, Japan, Australia, and Russia.

A pink vase made in the Ly Dynasty (1009 - 1225) with a distinctively concave bottom. Cuong said that is not easy to tell the cost of the museum, as the prices of artifacts are varied. He also spends money to hire 3-4 presenters welcoming guests and introducing artifacts in the museum.  When I open the museum, I do ask anyone to pay, because I just want to store and give the historic artifacts to the later generation, and revive our traditional values, Cuong said, adding his children will help him do the job in the future.

A vase made during the Ly Dynasty (1009–1225) era with a distinctive concave bottom.
Cuong employs four people to welcome guests and explain about the artifacts. "I do not ask for entrance fees. My children would maintain the museum in future," he said.

About two groups of visitors visit the museum every day.

A few groups of visitors visit the museum every day.

 
 
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