Long Bien bridge to get fresh lick of paint

By Nguyen Ngoan   October 4, 2021 | 10:32 am GMT+7
Hanoi authorities have decided to repaint 123-year-old Long Bien Bridge after sprucing it up 14 years ago.
The entire bridge has rusted since the last time it was painted 14 years ago. To protect it from the test of time, Ha Hai Railway Joint Stock Company has mobilized workers to maintain the bridge since Sept. 18.

The bridge across Red River was designed and built by French firm Daydé-Pillié in Sept. 1898. It opened to traffic in 1902, running more than 1,691 meters long, with a rail track in the middle and road transportation on either side. For generations of Hanoians, Long Bien Bridge has been an iconic feature of the capital.
Ha Hai Railway Company has started repainting rusted railings and replacing old sleepers since Sept. 18.

Workers have painted the railings and replaced degraded sleepers.

Workers have painted railings and replaced degraded sleepers.

40 workers are divided into four teams and will finish the job in Nov.

Forty staff members, divided into four teams, would finish the job by November.

Workers clean the railings before applying anti-rust paint, and another two layers of paint afterwards.

Workers clean the railings before applying anti-rust paint, before a sealant layer.

These sleepers will be thoroughly checked and replaced if necessary.

Sleepers are checked and replaced if necessary.

The bridge across the Red River was designed and built by French firm Daydé-Pillié in Sept. 1898. It opened to traffic in 1902, running more than 1,691 meters long, with a rail track in the middle and road transportation on either side.Ha Hai Railways Companys deputy director, Ta Quang Son, said that each year, maintenance work is done four times, including removing rusted parts and repainting them, replacing rusty and loose sleepers and screws, and cleaning the bridge.Previously, in the 1995-2010 period, VNR spent VND116 billion ($5 million) repairing the bridge. In 2015, the government allocated VND300 billion from the state budget for a large-scale preservation project for the bridge.

Previously, in the 1995-2010 period, the Vietnam Railways Corporation spent VND116 billion ($5 million) repairing the bridge. In 2015, the government allocated VND300 billion from the state budget to help preserve the iconic structure.
During the Vietnam War (1955-1975), the bridge had some of its parts damaged and even destroyed by enemy bombing. The Vietnamese government fixed the damage, building the spans that are in use until today.

 
 
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