Kapok trees herald summer in Hanoi

By Ha Thanh   March 17, 2020 | 11:04 am GMT+7

At 1,000-year-old Thay Pagoda in Hanoi’s Quoc Oai District, blooming kapok trees welcome the devout.

The kapok trees, believed by many Vietnamese to be favored by ghosts, are an amazing sight in many northern delta villages at this time of the year, because they are often planted to line rice fields or at village entrances.At this time of the year, the ancient pagoda in Hanoi is surrounded by the red sight of kapok trees, which bloom from early March.

Kapok trees, believed by many Vietnamese to be favored by ghosts, are an outstanding sight in many northern delta communities this time of year, often lining rice fields or village entrances.

Come March, the ancient pagoda in Hanoi is adorned by red kapok trees blooming in profusion.

Thay Pagoda is about 30km southwest of downtown Hanoi and situated at the foot of Sai Son Mountain. Built in the 11th century, during the reign of King Ly Nhan Tong, the pagoda is closely associated with monk Tu Dao Hanh who was well-known for his humility and generosity towards the poor. Legend has it that Hanh invented water puppetry to depict the lives of the rural population.

Thay Pagoda lies about 30 km southwest of downtown Hanoi, situated at the foot of Sai Son Mountain.

Built in the 11th century, during the reign (1072--1128) of King Ly Nhan Tong, the pagoda is closely associated with monk Tu Dao Hanh who was well-known for his humility and generosity towards the poor. Legend has it that Hanh invented water puppetry to depict the lives of the rural population.

The Asian tropical tree is also known as red silk-cotton or just silk-cotton. Its bark, root and flowers are used in oriental medicine.

This tropical Asian tree is also known as red silk-cotton or just silk-cotton. Its bark, root and flowers are used in oriental medicine.

According to Oriental medicine, kapok trees are used as medicines to clear away heat and detoxicate. Particularly their flowers are used to treat many diseases such as peptic ulcer.

Kapok trees are used in medicines to clear away heat and detoxicate. Particularly, their flowers are used to treat diseases like peptic ulcers.

During the blooming flower season, kapok trees lose their leaves, only red flowers on the branches.

During flower season, kapok trees lose their leaves, with only red flowers clinging to their branches.

In addition to Thay Pagoda, kapok trees are grown in parks, pavements, villages and spiritual sites such as temples and pagodas in localities across the country such as Hanoi, Son La and Ha Giang in northern Vietnam and Quang Ngai and Hue in central region. 

In addition to Thay Pagoda, kapok trees are grown in parks, on pavements, at villages and spiritual sites in Hanoi, northern provinces of Son La and Ha Giang, as well as in Quang Ngai Province and Hue Town, central Vietnam. 

In front of the pagoda is Long Chieu Lake. In the middle of the lake is a floating temple that serves as a stage for water puppet shows.On festive days, this place becomes the stage for water puppeteers.

In front of Thay Pagoda lies the Long Chieu Lake (also called Long Tri Lake), in the middle of which stands a temple that serves as a water puppetry stage. 

 
 
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