Vietnam, Australia share concerns over regional maritime security

By Viet Anh   May 24, 2018 | 02:56 pm GMT+7
Vietnam, Australia share concerns over regional maritime security
Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang (R) and Australian Governor-General Peter Cosgrove shake hands after their meeting in Hanoi on May 24. Photo by VnExpress/Giang Huy

Leaders from the countries have agreed to boost cooperation to maintain regional peace in 2018.

Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang and Australian Governor-General Peter Cosgrove agreed to boost cooperation to maintain peace which has been challenged in the region, according to a news conference in Hanoi on Thursday.

The politicians, who met during Cosgrove's three-day state visit, said there are now several factors that can affect regional stablility, including terrorism, transnational crime, cybersecurity, and maritime tension.

“We confirmed that Vietnam and Australia will continue the tight coordination at regional and international forums, including ASEAN, ASEAN-led institutions, and the U.N.,” Quang told reporters.

“The two nations are on the same side about disputed issues in the East Sea and will work together to initiate the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP),” he said, referring to the giant trade deal signed between Australia, Vietnam and nine other economies in March. Vietnam calls the South China Sea the East Sea.

Cosgrove also said that the two nations will boost cooperation in maritime security, peace keeping and education this year.

Both had agreed to deepen the strategic partnership signed in March when Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc visited Australia.

Vietnam and Australia established diplomatic relations in 1973. In 2017, Australia was Vietnam's eighth largest trade partner, while Vietnam was Australia's 14th largest, according to Vietnam's customs data.

Bilateral trade increased 22.7 percent from the previous year to $6.45 billion in 2017. Vietnam's main exports to Australia include machinery and parts, electronic equipment, footwear, textiles and seafood, while it imports mostly metals, coal, wheat and cotton from Australia.

 
 
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