Skyscrapers are not working for Da Nang: official

By VnExpress   December 9, 2016 | 02:33 pm GMT+7
Skyscrapers are not working for Da Nang: official
The central city faces serious problems from rapid urbanization as its population is estimated to rise to 2.5 million by 2030. Photo by VnExpress/ Nguyen Dong

High-rise buildings have brought a large number of residents into a small area and worsened traffic congestion in the city.

High-rise buildings are increasing the population density in the central districts of Da Nang and putting huge pressure on transport infrastructure, its mayor has said.

“We’ve started thinking about restrictions on housing developments and migration to the inner city,” Huynh Duc Tho, chairman of the city's People's Committee, said at a meeting of the People’s Council (the municipal legislature) on Thursday.

“A multi-story residential building can squeeze in 700-800 families. That surely would make traffic congestion more severe,” he said.

Da Nang’s population will increase to 2.5 million by 2030, according to projections by the Japan International Co-operation Agency. This would put mounting pressure on the city’s transport infrastructure with around 700,000 private vehicles, of which 94 percent would be motorcycles.

As one of Vietnam’s major cities, Da Nang has been experiencing a boom in skyscrapers in recent years.

The idea of building upward is tempting. By stacking dwellings one above another, a plot of land can accommodate more people.

However, the city’s leaders now fear that the cluster of high-rise buildings may create more problems than they solve.

Tho said that the central city has yet to come up with any practical solution to curb congestion. Reducing the use of private vehicles in downtown areas, the mayor said, “is hardly feasible due to a lack of public transport.”

Da Nang is waiting for the central government’s approval to introduce higher parking fees in downtown areas, he said.

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