Hoi An’s Malabar almond trees herald spring with splashes of red

By Huynh Phuong    February 11, 2020 | 01:30 pm GMT+7

In spring the leaves of Malabar almond trees turn red and add flamboyance to the ancient town of Hoi An in central Vietnam.

A red-leafed almond tree on Nguyen Thi Minh Khai Street stands out on the brown tile roof of the 400-year-old town, which was recognized as a UNESCO heritage site in 1999. Hoi An is charming at any time of the year but I prefer  of spring due to pleasant weather, beautiful scenery when the red leaves of almond trees bring a quiet and romantic look, said photographer Do Anh Vu, a local and the author of the photo series.

A red-leafed Malabar almond tree on Nguyen Thi Minh Khai Street stands out amid the brown tile roofs of the 400-year-old UNESCO heritage town.

"Hoi An is charming at any time of the year but I prefer spring due to the pleasant weather and beautiful scenery when the red leaves of Malabar almond trees bring a quiet and romantic look," Do Anh Vu, a local photographer and the author of this photo collection, said.

Tropical Malabar almond trees near the iconic Pagoda Brdige have started shedding their leaves. The Pagoda Bridge was built by Japanese traders in the 17th century, and a national relic that appears on VND20,000 bills.

Malabar almond trees near the iconic Pagoda Bridge have started shedding their leaves.

The bridge was built by Japanese traders in the 17th century, and is now a national relic that appears on VND20,000 bills.

A shop selling souvenirs on Nguyen Thi Minh Khai street is shaded by the almond tree with leaves turning red colors.

A shop selling souvenirs on Nguyen Thi Minh Khai Street is shaded by a Malabar almond tree with red leaves.

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A Malabar almond tree shines under the warm sunlight.

The almond trees change leaves on both sides of Thai Phien Street. This is an ideal occasion for photographers to take photo shots. Unlike Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi, the two biggest cities in Vietnam that are flooded with waves of noisy vehicles and modern skyscrapers, Hoi An has been much loved for its tranquility and slow pace of life.

Malabar almond trees on both sides of Thai Phien Street have changed the color of their leaves. This is an ideal occasion for photographers to take photos.

Unlike Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, Vietnam’s two bustling metropolises, Hoi An is much loved for its tranquility and relaxed pace.

A mattress of red almond tree leaves on a street sidewalk in Hoi An.

Red Malabar almond tree leaves litter a street sidewalk.

Two foreign tourists cycle to explore the old town on Pham Hong Thai Street under the shades of almond trees. In Hoi An, some streets such as Nguyen Thi Minh Khai, Nguyen Thai Hoc, Pham Hong Thai or Thai Phien have been planted with many almond trees.

Two people cycle on Pham Hong Thai Street under the shade of Malabar almond trees. Streets such as Nguyen Thi Minh Khai, Nguyen Thai Hoc, Pham Hong Thai, and Thai Phien are full of the trees.

Photos by Do Anh Vu

 
 
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