Vietnam’s aging population puts pressure on healthcare system

December 4, 2018 | 05:25 pm GMT+7

Its rapidly aging population is imposing a big burden on Vietnam’s healthcare system. 

According to the World Bank’s 2016 report titled "Live Long and Prosper: Aging in East Asia and Pacific" the ratio of the elder people in Vietnam is 11 percent and will account for a fifth of the population in the next 10 years. 

An aging population affects socio-economic development and burdens the healthcare system.

The burdens, pointed out at a forum on "Paving the path for the future in healthcare: Driving efficiency and outcomes in a rapidly aging Asia" include seniors’ growing demand for healthcare services, a rising number and complexity of chronic diseases, the double burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases, and more. 

The forum was held by the Vietnam Medical Association and Novartis Vietnam on November 12 - 13 this year. 

Vietnam Medical Association in partnership with Novartis Vietnam organized the 11th Future Trends Forum on Paving the path for the future in healthcare.

Vietnam Medical Association in partnership with Novartis Vietnam organized the 11th Future Trends Forum on "Paving the path for the future in healthcare".

Vietnam Medical Association in partnership with Novartis Vietnam organized the 11th Future Trends Forum on "Paving the path for the future in healthcare" 

Firstly, the current over-reliance on hospital care could exacerbate the cost pressures brought on by an aging population with many non-communicable diseases.

Secondly, the poor quality of primary care poses a challenge to the cost-effective management of health conditions that increase with age such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. 

Thirdly, pharmaceutical expenses and procurement create inefficiencies in healthcare, which are exacerbated by an aging population.

The country now has around 10 million people aged 60 or more, accounting for about 11 percent of the population. The ratio is expected to reach 20 percent in the next decade. A larger senior citizen population could lead to labour shortages, increased cost of social welfare and a heavier burden on the public healthcare system.

According to experts, the current situation in many countries proves that technology plays a significant role in finding and effectively using resources for healthcare in the context of an aging population.

At the forum, Dr Po-Chang Lee, director general, National Health Insurance Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan, spoke about the strategic use of IT - cloud healthcare in Taiwan and leveraging IT to achieve better patient outcomes.

Obviously, the participation of leading healthcare corporations plays an important role in the acceleration of connectivity and innovation in the healthcare sector.

Nguyen Thi Xuyen, president of the Vietnam Medical Association and the ASEAN Medical Association, said: "The contributions and experiences shared by academic leaders, healthcare policy makers and, especially, innovative and high-tech healthcare corporations such as Novartis would surely enhance the quality of healthcare services in Vietnam and other Asian countries."

Nguyen Thi Xuyen, president of the Vietnam Medical Association and ASEAN Medical Association, speaks at the forum.

Nguyen Thi Xuyen, president of the Vietnam Medical Association and ASEAN Medical Association, speaks at the forum.

With its efforts to collaborate with the Ministry of Health, Novartis is a healthcare corporation that constantly seeks solutions for the urgent issues facing the healthcare system.

For years, Novartis has been committed to providing support programs to help patients on access to high-quality and advanced healthcare services, which is the primary goal of building a sustainable health system.

"Novartis is committed to improving the healthcare sector in Vietnam in terms of quality, cost and accessibility," Roeland Roelofs, country president of Novartis Vietnam, said. 

Roeland Roelofs, country president of Novartis Vietnam, said his company is committed to improving the countrys healthcare sector with regards to quality, cost and accessibility.

Roeland Roelofs, country president of Novartis Vietnam, said his company is committed to improving the country’s healthcare sector with regards to quality, cost and accessibility.

The forum clarified the challenges the healthcare sector has to face in the context of a rapidly aging population. It sought to connect healthcare policymakers and academic leaders in the healthcare sector, allowing them to share ideas and best practices and discuss ways to improve the healthcare system.

Hà My

 
 
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