Exhibition looks back at Hanoi in the 19th century

By An Nguyen   November 30, 2019 | 06:00 pm GMT+7

More than 70 documents, maps and images of Hanoi Citadel during the Nguyen Dynasty era (1802-1945) are on display at an exhibition.

First built during the Ly dynasty in 1010, Hanoi Citadel, also known as Thang Long Imperial Palace, is a significant historical location of Vietnam. It was later expanded in Le-Tran dynasties and Nguyen Dynasty.The Nguyen Dynasty built Hanoi Citadel on the former foundation of the palace under the Le Dynasty with Vauban fortified architecture. Though it no longer held a central position in that era, the citadel still played an important political role. Kinh Thien Palace (as seen in the center of the map) acted as a step-over palace for Nguyen’s Kings on their trips to the north. In addition, solemn rituals such as welcome parties for foreign emissaries or discussion of state’s affairs, took place here.

First built by the Ly Dynasty in 1010, the Hanoi Citadel, also known as the Thang Long Imperial Palace, was later expanded by the Le-Tran dynasties and the Nguyen Dynasty.

The Nguyen rulers rebuilt the Hanoi Citadel on the former foundation of the palace built by the Le kings with Vauban fortified architecture.

Though it no longer held a central position under the Nguyens, the citadel still played an important political role. Kinh Thien Palace (seen in the

center of the map) was a place to stop over for the Nguyen kings during trips to the north. Besides, rituals such as welcome parties for

foreign emissaries and discussions of state affairs also took place here.

Hanoi Citadel’s North Gate as seen from the outside in the 19th century. 

The Hanoi Citadel’s North Gate seen from the outside in the 19th century. 

The Citadel’s East Gate as seen from the outside in 1889 - 1891.

The citadel’s East Gate circa 1890.

A look from the inside of the Southeast Gate in 1888 - 1891.

A view from the inside of the Southeastern Gate circa 1890.

The Citadel’s West Gate from the outside in 1870.

The West Gate seen from outside in 1870.

Full view of the Hanoi Citadel from the East Gate in 1873.

Aerial view of the Hanoi Citadel from the East Gate in 1873.

French Colonial Army attacked the Citadel for the first time from the Southeast Gate on Nov. 20, 1873. The two following attacks took place in 1873 and 1882. Under French influences, Hanoi Citadel’s architecture and uses changed significantly between 1883 and 1897.Besides utilizing already available structures, the French army erected additional military facilities and headquarters.

The French colonial army attacked the citadel for the first time through the Southeastern Gate on November 20, 1873. The next two attacks

came in 1873 and 1882. 

Under French influence, the Hanoi Citadel’s architecture and uses changed significantly between 1883 and 1897. Besides utilizing already available structures, the French army also erected additional military facilities and headquarters.

Doan Mon gate was renovated as French Army base.

Doan Mon Gate was renovated for use as a French Army base.

The Flag Tower was turned into a turret near the end of the 19th century.

The Flag Tower was turned into a turret near the end of the 19th century.

An additional blockhouse erected inside of the citadel at the end of the 19th century.

An additional blockhouse was built inside the citadel at the end of the 19th century.

Chinh Duong Tower, the eastern access to Long Thien Palace, was turned into French Army’s artillery headquarters in 1888 - 1891.

Chinh Duong Tower, the eastern access to Long Thien Palace, was turned into the French army’s artillery headquarters in 1888 - 1891.

Foxholes were dug into the East Gate in 1882. Behind the gate stood the infantry barracks, built in 1890.

The East Gate in 1882. Behind the gate stood the infantry barracks, built in 1890.

Aerial view of Hanoi in the beginning of the 20th century. Around this time, Hanoi became the administrative center of French Indochina.The exhibition runs until the end of Dec. 2019.

Aerial view of Hanoi at the beginning of the 20th century. Around this time the city became the administrative center of French Indochina.

The "Hanoi Citadel - A Mark of Time" exhibition runs until the end of December 2019 at the Imperial Citadel of Thang Long – Hanoi Conservation Center at 9 Hoang Dieu, Hoan Kiem District.

 
 
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