Canadian warship to make port call in Vietnam

By Minh Nga   September 25, 2018 | 04:07 pm GMT+7
Canadian warship to make port call in Vietnam
Canadian frigate HMCS Calgary. Photo courtesy of Canadian Department of National Defense

A Canadian naval frigate is set to make a port call in the central city of Da Nang this week.

HMCS Calgary is currently taking part in Operation Projection in the Asia-Pacific and will visit Da Nang Port on September 26-30, Canada's Department of National Defense and Canadian Armed Forces announced.

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members are operating in maritime environments around the world during the mission "to make the world more secure and enhance relationships with Canada’s allies and partners."

During this operation, the CAF is conducting training, exercises, and engagements with foreign navies and other international security partners.

During their visit to Vietnam, the crew of HMCS Calgary will be undertaking activities to support Canada’s mission of building and reinforcing international relations.

“The highlight will come upon the completion of the port visit when we put out to sea for an exercise with the Vietnam People’s Navy, so as to extend and improve our network of defense partnerships in the region,” Commander Blair Saltel, commanding officer of the frigate, said in a statement.

Canada sent HMCS Vancover to HCMC back in 2016, and the upcoming visit by HMCS Calgary to Da Nang Port is a manifestation of Canada's resolve to play a greater role in the Indo-Pacific, Carl Thayer, an Australia-based analyst of regional security, told VnExpress International in an email.

HMCS Calgary is a Halifax-class frigate that has served in the navy since 1995. It has a crew of 230.

Besides Da Nang, the warship will also visit seven other ports during Operation Projection, Darwin in Australia, Yokosuka and Yokohama in Japan, Jeju and Busan in South Korea, and Guam and Pearl Harbor in the U.S.

Vietnam has welcomed visits by different navies recently.

The Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force submarine for the first time visited Cam Ranh Port on September 17 while South Korean Navy destroyer ROKS Moon Mu the Great docked in Da Nang on September 11.

Commenting on those dock calls, Thayer said: "All maritime powers have a national interest in the maintenance of freedom of navigation and overflight over the high seas. The sea lanes that pass through the South China Sea are vital sea lines of communications that sustain the global economy.

“Canada, Japan and South Korea are three such maritime powers."

Some $3 trillion of ship-borne trade passes the South China Sea, which Vietnam calls the East Sea, each year.

 
 
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