Award-winning photo show returns to Vietnam

By Phan Anh   June 7, 2018 | 02:53 pm GMT+7
Award-winning photo show returns to Vietnam
A photo by Richard Tsong-Taatarii for the Star Tribune, to be displayed at the World Press Photo Exhibition 2018, shows John Thompson embraced in Minnesota, U.S., after speaking out at a memorial rally for his close friend Philando Castile on June 18, 2017, two days after police officer Jeronimo Yanez was acquitted of all charges in the shooting of Castile.

World Press Photo Exhibition 2018 in Hanoi will feature 130 outstanding pictures taken by top photojournalists.

An international press photo exhibition including famous classics like the “Napalm Girl” will return to Hanoi this month after 15 years.

The exhibition will feature 130 award winning photographs in different categories taken by photojournalists from around the world.

The World Press Photo Exhibition 2018 is being organized by the Embassy of the Netherlands as part of a celebration of 45 years of diplomatic ties between Vietnam and the Netherlands.

It is only the second time that this exhibition is being held in Vietnam, the first one held at a gallery on Hang Trong Street in 2003.

Most Vietnamese and foreign visitors to this year’s exhibition will recognize history-making photos like that of “Napalm Girl," a Pulitzer Prize winner taken by Nick Ut in 1972, photographs of the Son Doong cave by Carsten Peter taken in 2010, and the “The Pink Choice” by Maika Elan taken in 2013, which captures homosexual relations in Vietnam.

Photographer Nick Ut speaks to the media next to his photo Napalm Girl. Officially known as The Terror of War, the black and white photo shows a  terrified girl, Phan Thi Kim Phuc, running naked and screaming after  being burned in a napalm attack by the U.S. on June 8, 1972. Photo by Reuters

Photographer Nick Ut speaks to the media next to his photo "Napalm Girl." Officially known as "The Terror of War," the black and white photo shows a terrified girl, Phan Thi Kim Phuc, running naked and screaming after being burned in a napalm attack by the U.S. on June 8, 1972. Photo by Reuters

The photos are taken from the Amsterdam-based non-profit, World Press Photo, which organizes an international press photo contest every year.

Established in 1955 in Amsterdam, the World Press Photo Foundation is a non-profit which aims to support professional photojournalism. Its annual press photo exhibitions visit over 100 major cities around the world and attract 4 million visitors every year, according to the foundation’s official website.

This year, the exhibition’s other Asian destinations include Singapore, Tokyo, Kyoto and Macau.

The exhibition will be held at the Fine Arts University on Yet Kieu Street in Hanoi between June 16 and July 6, free to the public.

 
 
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