Hanoi Brick Cave blurs boundaries to remain connected

By Long Nguyen   November 30, 2019 | 01:00 pm GMT+7

The Brick Cave has two layers of porous brick walls that keep the house secure but open to the outside world at all times.

At the ceremony in Bangladesh earlier this month, the house, which was designed by architect Doan Thanh Ha, was awarded in the category of single family residential project. The award is organized annually by The  Architects Regional Council Asia (ARCASIA)  in order to raise the benchmark of architectural practice in Asians countries. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The house, located in the rural district of Dong Anh in the capital city, was built in 2007 on a 300-square-meter plot. Its outer wall has several porous patterns that give it an unusual openness to the outer world while offering full security to its inhabitants. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

Located in the rural district of Dong Anh in Hanoi, the house had also been honored at the Barbara Cappochin International Architecture Prize, held  by the Barbara Cappochin Foundation, the Council of Architects, Planners, Landscapers and Conservationists of Padua, Italy. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

At an awards ceremony organized by the Architects Regional Council Asia (ARCASIA) in Bangladesh earlier this month, the house, designed by architect Doan Thanh Ha, was chosen the more creative single family residential project. Earlier, it had won the Barbara Cappochin International Architecture Prize and the Council of Architects, Planners, Landscapers and Conservationists of Padua, Italy. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

According to the architect, the structure of the Brick Cave is made up of and enclosed by two layers of brick wall meeting one another at an intersection. Brick was chosen because it is a local material and popular in rural areas of Vietnam, which was simple and quick to construct. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

According to the architect, the 'Brick Cave' has two layers of walls, one angled, creating an atrium-like space. The exposed bricks were chosen because they are local material and popular in rural areas. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The brick walls connect the interior space with the nature. They can be a filter to keep bright sunshine, dust and noise out of the main living spaces. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The design provides the house with an extra layer of security. Its marble floors enhance of the sunlight that comes in through the porous walls. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The house has rooms interconnected with one another through random apertures. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The rooms in the house are connected with one another through creatively arranged apertures without doors. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

A garden is planted on the roof. The outer wall begins to angle inwards at around two metres up, reducing the houses overall volume and creating an angular shape. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

A roof garden crowns the sloping roof of the outer wall. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The walls are dotted with both small and large openings allow both light and air to penetrate. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

The porous walls that allow plenty of sunlight and air help "blur the boundaries between house and street, humans and nature," the architect explained. Photo by Archdaily/Nguyen Tien Thanh.

 
 
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