Da Lat home hides 'forest' behind modernist exterior

By Minh Trang   September 18, 2021 | 03:00 pm GMT+7
Surrounded by gently sloping retainer walls, this concrete house in Da Lat, Lam Dong Province, boasts a juxtaposing green, airy interior.
Located on a 110-meter-square land plot, the house is also a place for homeowners to run their business, which has gone through changes amid the pandemic, from a bakery to a bookshop, and a bedding showroom.

Located on a 110-meter-square land plot, the house affords the perfect conditions for its work-from-home owners, who have used it as a bakery, bookshop, and bedding showroom.

The architecture itself is a reflection of the coexistence of the opposites: Natural versus Man-made; Heavy versus Light; Dark versus Bright; Solid versus Void. According to architects, they achieve these pairs through spatial arrangement, the material used, lighting design, and color combination.

Its architecture reflects the coexistence of opposites: Natural versus Man-made; Heavy versus Light; Dark versus Bright; Solid versus Void. This effect is underscored by the utilization of spatial arrangement, material, lighting design, and color combination.

The solid and heavy material of the facade is inspired from Europen architecture.

The solid, heavy façade resembles a near brutalist perspective.

A garden is located on the ground. An outdoor staircase is proposed so that guests can directly go to the showroom on the first floor right from the buffering zone.

An outdoor staircase is proposed so that guests can directly access the showroom on the first floor right from the buffering zone.

An ariel view of the garden.

An aerial view of the garden.

The owner’s suite and the guest bedrooms are all arranged in the backside whilst the public parts are put in front, where trees are plants.

The owner’s suite and guest bedrooms are all arranged at the back whilst common areas are placed in front.

The ground floor space is conceived as an extension of the outside landscape, creating a sense of ambiguity that unshapen between inside and outside. The frame structure and perforated steel treads for the stairs system also let natural light enter the building through a skylight.

The ground floor is conceived as an extension of the outside landscape, creating a sense of ambiguity between inside and outside. The frame structure and perforated steel treads for the stairs system also let natural light enter the building through a skylight.

Bedrooms are located in the back of the house.

Bedrooms are located at the back of the house.

The outdoor stairs continue to the terrace, where residents can have a panorama view towards the pine forest valley.

The outdoor stairs continue to the terrace, where residents can enjoy a panorama view towards the pine forest valley.

Photos by Tad.atelier

 
 
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