Cubism shines light on pottery studio

By Pham Van   July 27, 2016 | 07:30 am GMT+7

A stunning piece of architecture created to shelter art.

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Sitting by the Thu Bon River in Quang Nam Province, the Terra Cotta Studio was commissioned by eminent artist Le Duc Ha. Built and designed by Vietnamese architects, the creative space is specifically designed to form, shape, dry and store terracotta works of art.

The project is a cubed-shape building that measures 7m x 7m x 7m.

The project is a cubic building that measures 7m x 7m x 7m on an area of 49 square meters. Surrounding the studio is a bamboo frame scaffold used for drying terracotta products, acting at the same time as a fence to separate the studio from the outside.

The outmost layer of the structure is made of solid bricks interleaved, leaving holes that help ventilate the inner space and give the owner sufficient privacy instead becoming a normal wall that seal the artist from nature.

The outer layer of the structure is made from solid bricks with holes that help ventilate the inner space and give the owner sufficient privacy, instead of normal walls that seal the artist from nature.

Inside is the wood frames that form the shelves system, hallways and staircase connecting the ground floor with the mezzanine of this two-storey studio.

Inside are wooden frames that form the shelving system, hallways and staircase connecting the ground floor with the mezzanine of this two-storey studio.

The artist amid his workshop space.

The artist amid his workshop space.

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The mezzanine is flooded with natural daylight through a glass ceiling.

Letting light in throughout the day, the structure becomes a lantern at night being lit from inside.

Letting light in throughout the day, the structure becomes a lantern at night when it is lit up from the inside.

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Photos by Hiroyuki Oki, courtesy of Tropical Space

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